Dad in Michigan and beyond often get a bad rap as noncustodial parents. Divorce does not mean a father is abdicating his responsibilities as a parent. The overwhelming majority of fathers want what is best for their children. There are several ways noncustodial dads can avoid legal problems and can maintain close bonds with their kids while living in separate households.

Once the court approves a parenting plan schedule, a noncustodial dad will want to make it a top priority to adhere to the terms of the agreement. If a parent does not show up at the agreed upon location and time to collect the children for parenting time, it is bound to spark legal problems. Any number of issues may arise that make a parenting plan order unworkable; however, a noncustodial parent must go through the proper channels to request modification of the court order rather than making changes without formal permission from the judge overseeing the case.

A noncustodial parent may also avoid problems with a co-parent by showing a willingness to cooperate and work as a team with children‘s best interests in mind. Parental conflict often causes stress for children after divorce. A noncustodial dad whose goal is to keep a close bond with his kids will want to minimize this type of stress as much as possible.

Similar to adhering to the terms of a parenting time schedule, a noncustodial dad who has been ordered to pay child support will want to keep thorough records of all payments and do his best to make payments on time. Again, if a need for modification arises, a parent paying child support must file a petition in court to request a change in the terms of the agreement. Not making payments can lead to serious legal problems. Noncustodial parents who keep such things in mind are less likely to have to return to court after divorce.