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Lifestyle choices and filing for divorce

Marriages are brought to an end for countless reasons. Sometimes, a divorce is relatively abrupt, while other couples may divorce after discussing the idea for a number of years. Some marriages end because of abuse or financial hardships, while others may be the result of lifestyle choices. Sometimes, these issues can be intertwined. For example, a spouse may regularly go out at night with friends and come home intoxicated, which can lead to various marital problems. Or, a spouse may be unhappy with their partner’s gambling addiction, excessive travel or any other behavior that leads to disagreement and friction in the marriage.

On the other hand, you may want to end your marriage as a result of your own lifestyle preferences. You may feel that you and your spouse want different things in life and are no longer compatible. For example, you may want to move to the city for work opportunities and for social reasons, while your spouse may be content in the countryside. Or, your spouse may be unhappy with your dedication to a particular interest, such as regular social media use, surfing, bodybuilding, classic cars or any other number of pursuits. Sometimes, these hobbies and interests can actually cause a marriage to fail.

If you are in the midst of a divorce due to your lifestyle or your spouse’s lifestyle choices, or for another reason altogether, it is very important to prepare yourself for what could lie ahead. If you have kids or financial concerns, you may need to be especially cautious as you approach the divorce process.

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Lorrie J. Zahodnic

"I will hold you up until you can stand on your own two feet."

Lorrie J. Zahodnic, P.C. has provided skilled and compassionate legal guidance to Michiganders in family law matters for over 20 years.

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